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  #1  
Old 08-03-2006, 11:59 AM
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dtown dtown is offline
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What a Waste!

20 ways you waste money on your car

By Des Toups


Cars make us irrational. We call them our babies and lovingly wax them every Saturday -- or we turn up the radio to drown out the sound of a dragging muffler. Either mindset will cost you money, sometimes a lot of it.
Walking the line between obsession and neglect means you never spend a nickel without a good reason -- and good reasons can include spending money on something thatís not broken.

Here, then, are 20 ways you waste money on your car.
Premium gas instead of regular. Buy the cheapest gasoline that doesnít make your car engine knock. All octane does is prevent knock; a grade higher than the maker of your car recommends is not a ďtreat.Ē
3,000-mile oil changes. Manufacturers typically suggest 5,000 miles, 7,500 miles or even longer intervals between oil changes (many car markers now include oil-life monitors that tell you when the oil is dirty -- sometimes as long as 15,000 miles.) There may be two recommendations for oil-change intervals: one for normal driving and one for hard use. If you live in a cold climate, take mostly very short trips, tow a trailer or have a high-revving, high-performance engine, use the more aggressive schedule. If you seldom drive your car, go by the calendar rather than your odometer. Twice a year changes are the minimum.
Taking false economies. Better to replace a timing belt on the manufacturerís schedule than to have it break somewhere in western Nebraska. Better to pop for snow tires than to ride that low-profile rubber right into a tree.
Using the dealerís maintenance schedule instead of the factoryís. Of course he thinks you should have a major tune-up every 30,000 miles. Most of the tasks that we generally think of under the heading of ďtune-upĒ are now handled electronically. Stick to the manufacturerís schedule unless your car is not running well. If your engine doesn't "miss" -- skip a beat or make other odd noises -- donít change the spark plugs or wires until the manufacturer says so.
Using a dealer for major services. Independent shops almost always will do the same work much cheaper. Call around, ownerís manual in hand, to find out, mindful that the quality of the work is more of a question mark. Some dealers may tell you using outside garages violates the carís warranty. This is a lie.
Using a dealer for oil changes. Dealers sometimes run dirt-cheap specials, but otherwise youíll usually find changes cheaper elsewhere. If youíre using an independent shop for the first time, you might inconspicuously mark your old oil filter to make sure it has indeed been changed. And donít let them talk you into new wiper blades, new air filters or high-priced synthetic oil, unless your car is one of the few high-performance machines built for it.
Not replacing your air filter and wiper blades yourself. Buy them on sale at a discount auto-parts store rather than having a garage or dealer replace them. Replacement is simple for either part, a 5-minute job. A good schedule for new air filters is every other oil change in a dusty climate; elsewhere at least once every 20,000 miles. Treat yourself to new wipers (itís easiest to buy the whole blade, not the refill) once a year.
Going to any old repair shop. At the very least, make sure itís ASE-certified (a good housekeeping seal of approval from the nonprofit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence). From there, look for a well-kept shop with someone whoís willing to answer all your questions. Estimates must include a provision that no extra work will be done without your approval. Drive your car to make sure the problem is fixed before you pay. Pay with a credit card in case thereís a dispute later. Be courteous and pay attention. A good mechanic is hard to find.
Changing your antifreeze every winter. Change it only when a hydrometer suggests it will no longer withstand temperatures 30 degrees below the coldest your area sees in winter. Your dealer or oil-change shop should be happy to check it for free. Every two years is about right. But you also should keep your cooling system happy by running the air conditioner every few weeks in winter to keep it lubricated, checking for puddles underneath the car and replacing belts and hoses before they dry and crack.
Replacing tires when you should be replacing shocks. If your tires are wearing unevenly or peculiarly, your car may be out of alignment or your shocks or struts worn out.
Letting a brake squeal turn into a brake job. Squeal doesnít necessarily mean you need new rotors or pads; mostly, itís just annoying. Your first check -- you can probably see your front brakes through the wheels on your car -- is to look at the thickness of the pads. Pads thicker than a quarter-inch are probably fine. If your brakes emit a constant, high-pitched whine and the pads are thinner than a quarter-inch, replace them. If your car shimmies or you feel grinding through the pedal, then your brake rotors need to be turned or replaced.
Not complaining when your warranty claim is rejected. Check Alldata and the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) to see if a technical service bulletin (TSB) has been issued about the component in question. Manufacturers often will repair known defects outside the warranty period (sometimes called a secret warranty). It helps if youíve done your homework and havenít been a jerk.
Not keeping records. A logbook of every repair done to your car can help you decide if somethingís seriously out of whack. Didnít I just buy new brake pads? With a log and an envelope stuffed with receipts, youíll know who did the work and when, and whether or not thereís a warranty on the repair. And a service logbook helps at resale time, too.
Buying an extended warranty. Most manufacturers allow you to wait until just before the regular warranty expires to decide. By then you should know whether your car is troublesome enough to require the extended warranty. Most of them arenít worth the price.
Overinsuring. Never skimp on liability, but why buy collision and comprehensive insurance on a junker you can probably afford to replace? Add your deductible to your yearly bill for collision and comprehensive coverage, then compare that total with the wholesale value of the car. If itís more than half, reconsider.
Assuming the problem is major. If your car is overheating but you donít see a busted hose or lots of steam, it might be the $5 thermostat, not your radiator. Or it may be that ominous ďcheck engineĒ light itself thatís failed, not your alternator.
Not changing the fuel filter. Have it replaced as a part of your maintenance -- every two years or according to the manufacturerís schedule -- rather than when it becomes clogged with grit, leaving you at the mercy of the nearest garage.
Not knowing how to change a tire. Have you even looked at your spare? Make sure itís up to snuff and all the parts of your jack are there. Changing a flat yourself is not only cheaper, itís faster, too.
Not keeping your tires properly inflated. Check them once a month; otherwise, youíre wasting gasoline, risking a blowout and wearing them out more quickly.
Car washes. Ten bucks for long lines and gray water? Nothing shows you care like doing it yourself.
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  #2  
Old 08-03-2006, 12:08 PM
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ieatglue ieatglue is offline
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Useful stuff I've had a squeaking brake for a while and it was driving me crazy, i'll go check it's thickness About the fuel filter, will replacing it get better gas mileage?
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  #3  
Old 02-10-2009, 07:49 PM
07_TB_RIDER 07_TB_RIDER is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtown View Post
20 ways you waste money on your car

By Des Toups


Cars make us irrational. We call them our babies and lovingly wax them every Saturday -- or we turn up the radio to drown out the sound of a dragging muffler. Either mindset will cost you money, sometimes a lot of it.
Walking the line between obsession and neglect means you never spend a nickel without a good reason -- and good reasons can include spending money on something thatís not broken.

Here, then, are 20 ways you waste money on your car.
Premium gas instead of regular. Buy the cheapest gasoline that doesnít make your car engine knock. All octane does is prevent knock; a grade higher than the maker of your car recommends is not a ďtreat.Ē
3,000-mile oil changes. Manufacturers typically suggest 5,000 miles, 7,500 miles or even longer intervals between oil changes (many car markers now include oil-life monitors that tell you when the oil is dirty -- sometimes as long as 15,000 miles.) There may be two recommendations for oil-change intervals: one for normal driving and one for hard use. If you live in a cold climate, take mostly very short trips, tow a trailer or have a high-revving, high-performance engine, use the more aggressive schedule. If you seldom drive your car, go by the calendar rather than your odometer. Twice a year changes are the minimum.
Taking false economies. Better to replace a timing belt on the manufacturerís schedule than to have it break somewhere in western Nebraska. Better to pop for snow tires than to ride that low-profile rubber right into a tree.
Using the dealerís maintenance schedule instead of the factoryís. Of course he thinks you should have a major tune-up every 30,000 miles. Most of the tasks that we generally think of under the heading of ďtune-upĒ are now handled electronically. Stick to the manufacturerís schedule unless your car is not running well. If your engine doesn't "miss" -- skip a beat or make other odd noises -- donít change the spark plugs or wires until the manufacturer says so.
Using a dealer for major services. Independent shops almost always will do the same work much cheaper. Call around, ownerís manual in hand, to find out, mindful that the quality of the work is more of a question mark. Some dealers may tell you using outside garages violates the carís warranty. This is a lie.
Using a dealer for oil changes. Dealers sometimes run dirt-cheap specials, but otherwise youíll usually find changes cheaper elsewhere. If youíre using an independent shop for the first time, you might inconspicuously mark your old oil filter to make sure it has indeed been changed. And donít let them talk you into new wiper blades, new air filters or high-priced synthetic oil, unless your car is one of the few high-performance machines built for it.
Not replacing your air filter and wiper blades yourself. Buy them on sale at a discount auto-parts store rather than having a garage or dealer replace them. Replacement is simple for either part, a 5-minute job. A good schedule for new air filters is every other oil change in a dusty climate; elsewhere at least once every 20,000 miles. Treat yourself to new wipers (itís easiest to buy the whole blade, not the refill) once a year.
Going to any old repair shop. At the very least, make sure itís ASE-certified (a good housekeeping seal of approval from the nonprofit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence). From there, look for a well-kept shop with someone whoís willing to answer all your questions. Estimates must include a provision that no extra work will be done without your approval. Drive your car to make sure the problem is fixed before you pay. Pay with a credit card in case thereís a dispute later. Be courteous and pay attention. A good mechanic is hard to find.
Changing your antifreeze every winter. Change it only when a hydrometer suggests it will no longer withstand temperatures 30 degrees below the coldest your area sees in winter. Your dealer or oil-change shop should be happy to check it for free. Every two years is about right. But you also should keep your cooling system happy by running the air conditioner every few weeks in winter to keep it lubricated, checking for puddles underneath the car and replacing belts and hoses before they dry and crack.
Replacing tires when you should be replacing shocks. If your tires are wearing unevenly or peculiarly, your car may be out of alignment or your shocks or struts worn out.
Letting a brake squeal turn into a brake job. Squeal doesnít necessarily mean you need new rotors or pads; mostly, itís just annoying. Your first check -- you can probably see your front brakes through the wheels on your car -- is to look at the thickness of the pads. Pads thicker than a quarter-inch are probably fine. If your brakes emit a constant, high-pitched whine and the pads are thinner than a quarter-inch, replace them. If your car shimmies or you feel grinding through the pedal, then your brake rotors need to be turned or replaced.
Not complaining when your warranty claim is rejected. Check Alldata and the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) to see if a technical service bulletin (TSB) has been issued about the component in question. Manufacturers often will repair known defects outside the warranty period (sometimes called a secret warranty). It helps if youíve done your homework and havenít been a jerk.
Not keeping records. A logbook of every repair done to your car can help you decide if somethingís seriously out of whack. Didnít I just buy new brake pads? With a log and an envelope stuffed with receipts, youíll know who did the work and when, and whether or not thereís a warranty on the repair. And a service logbook helps at resale time, too.
Buying an extended warranty. Most manufacturers allow you to wait until just before the regular warranty expires to decide. By then you should know whether your car is troublesome enough to require the extended warranty. Most of them arenít worth the price.
Overinsuring. Never skimp on liability, but why buy collision and comprehensive insurance on a junker you can probably afford to replace? Add your deductible to your yearly bill for collision and comprehensive coverage, then compare that total with the wholesale value of the car. If itís more than half, reconsider.
Assuming the problem is major. If your car is overheating but you donít see a busted hose or lots of steam, it might be the $5 thermostat, not your radiator. Or it may be that ominous ďcheck engineĒ light itself thatís failed, not your alternator.
Not changing the fuel filter. Have it replaced as a part of your maintenance -- every two years or according to the manufacturerís schedule -- rather than when it becomes clogged with grit, leaving you at the mercy of the nearest garage.
Not knowing how to change a tire. Have you even looked at your spare? Make sure itís up to snuff and all the parts of your jack are there. Changing a flat yourself is not only cheaper, itís faster, too.
Not keeping your tires properly inflated. Check them once a month; otherwise, youíre wasting gasoline, risking a blowout and wearing them out more quickly.
Car washes. Ten bucks for long lines and gray water? Nothing shows you care like doing it yourself.
hmm good stuff
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  #4  
Old 02-11-2009, 12:36 AM
WOOLUF1952 WOOLUF1952 is offline
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I don't agree with everything , but for the most part it is right on.
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  #5  
Old 02-11-2009, 12:50 AM
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Yep good info
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  #6  
Old 02-11-2009, 01:42 AM
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ahabofthepequod ahabofthepequod is offline
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Oil changes -- I've kept a 5,000 mile schedule as long as I can remember. Each time I also change the filter.

Years ago Consumer Reports spec'd a fleet of New York city taxi cabs. Each engine was torn down then rebuilt. Each taxi was assigned a specific drum of oil that had to be used on that cab alone. Each cab was given a different oil change schedule. The oil changes were handled by an independent garage hired specifically for the test.

At the end of the test period each engine was torn down & mic'ed out.

The results were no measurable difference between a vehicle on a 3,000 mile or a 6,000 mile schedule.

False economies -- with the advent of newer tread patterns I've not had a need for snow tires in 30 years.

Dealer schedule -- I base my schedule on my particular driving pattern & mileage.

My normal schedule is -- Oil & filter every 5,000 miles This is easy to follow
on the odometer.
Tire maintenance, here's where I rotate my tires
while my oil is draining. I pull a tire, roll it, check for
& remove any stones/glass/debris (I've caught a lot
of leakers this way). Each tire & rim gets checked &
scrubbed down. I also note the tread wear pattern.
While he tires are off I check the underside for
anything unusual, including brakes, cables, lines,
wires, and shocks.

At times I use the dealer especially since I'm on good terms with the service people. Besides it helps if your brother-in-law plays golf with the dealership owner.

Oil changes -- Do them myself, know they're done right.

Do as much Maintenance myself as I can.

When I don't use the dealer I use a reputable shop.

Again being old school, I have a tester for my antifreeze. I change it when it's indicated.

Replacing shocks -- As I said earlier I constantly check my shocks. If I see it weeping oil I replace the pair. If I feel a different bounce in the tires I remove a shock & check it out. (I've had shocks that were worn out in the area where the vehicle normally operated. A bove or below that 3-4 inch area they were like new.)

By keeping an eye on tires & shocks my vehicles typically go 100,000 miles without alignment or front end repairs.

Same thing with brakes each oil change I check them (even drum type) that way I can see if I need to start saving for new pads or rotors & can schedule the work to meet my free time not while on a trip.

The next two items are tied together. Keep ALL RECEIPTS for parts & work done. If you note a problem with your car especially one still under warranty. Make sure the service people write up each issue. If you have a vibration in the rear axle and note it under warranty, and at 12,700 mile the rear end goes out you can get the repair done usually for free.

Also just before the warranty expires get any warranty covered defect fixed. That gets the repair done for free and gives you another 12 mos/12,000 mile warranty on that repair.

Also if there's a recall & you already paid for the problem to be fixed you can get your money back, but no receipt no refund.

Note on a repair what the complaint was, what the service guy wrote up and what was done to correct the issue. I had a bad electric fan connector & was charged $86 because they said the extended warranty didn't apply to the fan. I noted the repair was replacing the female plug on the "engine wire harness". The wire harness was a covered item, and I got my money back.

Assuming -- never assume. Use a logical approach and most problems can be readily identified. Eg. I had no air conditioning & the compressor wasn't cycling. I pulled off the plug to the switch by the compressor, Jumped the connection with a piece of wire & diagnosed a bad switch. For less than $25.00 I fixed the problem & had my air back.

On tires I always check them every oil change (as above) on a '75' Mustang I had the infamous Firestone 500 tires with 40,000 miles on them. When I went for the recall the dealer showed me a tire from another Mustang but with only 10,000 miles on it. My tire had more tread on it than the other tire.

Car washing/waxing -- I only wash my cars by hand, same thing with waxing them. By doing it myself I am looking at every square inch of the exterior. I will see chips, dents, and the slight discoloration of the paint indicating rust underneath.

By taking good care of my vehicles I've always been able to sell them easily myself and for more money than a dealer would give me. Plus it gives me a good feeling to be driving a 10 year old vehicle that looks/runs better than some newer cars.
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  #7  
Old 02-11-2009, 03:18 PM
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canetherton canetherton is offline
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My dealer is actually cheaper on oil changes than the local quick change places! 45 for Quick change or 31 for dealer
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